Anterior Hip Replacements May Lessen Frequency of Side Effects Associated With Stryker Hip Lawsuits

Anterior Hip Replacements May Lessen Frequency of Side Effects Associated With Stryker Hip Lawsuits

Pain, swelling, inflammation, infection – these side effects often named in not only Stryker hip lawsuits, but also claims over other metal hip replacements as well may become part of the past as a newer, less invasive type of hip replacement surgery begins to sweep the nation, the New York Times reports. An article published March 18th, 2013 discussed the benefits of anterior hip replacements, which cut into a patient’s hip instead of through the side or buttocks. As a result, the surgeon performing the operation can avoid disrupting major muscle groups which often lead to longer patient recovery times and early failure complications, which have led to a growing number of Stryker hip lawsuits.

Complications stemming from the implantation of artificial hips consisting of metal components are even more dangerous. For instance, a growing number of Stryker hip lawsuits have been filed on behalf of patients who received the Rejuvenate and/or ABG II modular-neck stems, which consist of cobalt and chromium. These implants were voluntarily recalled by Stryker Orthopaedics on July 6, 2012 after company data revealed that the components of these devices may fret or corrode, which could lead to adverse tissue reactions and possibly metallosis (metal ion poisoning). Approximately 20,000 Rejuvenate and ABG II devices were sold prior to the recall, which may cause the number of Stryker hip lawsuits to rise in the coming months. Anterior hip replacements may be the way of the future. One 63-year old Virginia man interviewed by the Times said he was back at work within two weeks of his operation, and was back at the gym four weeks later. “By the fourth week, I was doing a spin class at the athletic club,” he said. “I feel like I never had surgery.”

A year later, the patient said he has resumed his active lifestyle. He regularly cycles, lifts weights and plays racquetball. With anterior hip replacements, one orthopedic surgeon in Houston, Texas quoted in the Times said, “You can bend over. You can reach down to the floor. You can cross your legs – all things that patients with a posterior approach have to be careful about for a while because they can dislocate the hip.” If you experienced complications after undergoing a standard hip replacement that used metal components, you may be eligible to file a claim against the manufacturer. More and more patients who received the Stryker Rejuvenate and/or ABG II modular-neck stems have gone on to file Stryker hip lawsuits. Contact an attorney at Bernstein Liebhard LLP to learn more at (877) 779-1414.